True Account From America: Informative and Useful for Farmers and Others (Norwegian Emigration Literature) Ole Rynning

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Published: March 24th 2012

Kindle Edition

32 pages


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True Account From America: Informative and Useful for Farmers and Others (Norwegian Emigration Literature)  by  Ole Rynning

True Account From America: Informative and Useful for Farmers and Others (Norwegian Emigration Literature) by Ole Rynning
March 24th 2012 | Kindle Edition | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, AUDIO, mp3, RTF | 32 pages | ISBN: | 7.57 Mb

This is a most unusual book, open-minded, honest and to the point. It reads like it was written recently, as a modern travel guide. Yet it was done 175 years ago, by a man sick in bed in Beaver Creek, Illinois. The author had just arrived fromMoreThis is a most unusual book, open-minded, honest and to the point. It reads like it was written recently, as a modern travel guide. Yet it was done 175 years ago, by a man sick in bed in Beaver Creek, Illinois.

The author had just arrived from Norway, a student and son of a powerful pastor. His travel companions liked him very much, and so did many others he met on the trip with ÆGIR from Bergen to New York. Knud Langeland, editor and businessman in Chicago, who crossed the Atlantic that same Spring, in 1837, told this:“I cannot say with any certainty what it was that really made him want to emigrate. But judging from some comments Captain Behrens made, it appeared Rynning was of a more democratic orientation – and also sympatized more deeply with the farming class – than was acceptable to his aristocratic father, Pastor Rynning, in Trondheim.

His sons engagement to a local girl shall also have been regarded as a misalliance by his father- reportedly the latter was the direct reason for Rynnings move to America. One thing is sure: Rynnings mood reflected a deeply felt melancholy. But he had already decided on returning to Norway after a while, at least for a visit. He made no secret of this.”Those who knew him agreed Ole Rynning was an unusually noble and friendly person, who was always willing to help those in need.

These people in return trusted him practically unlimited. This was the reasons they asked him, with two others, to go and find good farmland, for they all wanted to become American farmers.The scouts set out south of Chicago, to the area along the Iroquois River, in the months of August and September.

The prairies they crossed were dry and covered with heavy grass, tall to their armpits. But the soil was rich and fertile. The party went along and in the Fall all had found farmland near Beaver Creek. And they felt the area met all their requirements.But heavy Spring rains flooded the land as far as they could see, and it stayed so for several months. With the dampness and chills of water everywhere, several settlers came down with Cold Fever.

And when the heat of Summer arrived and the water evaporated the scourge of Swamp Fever [Malaria] found daily victims. Suddenly everyone felt: “Save yourself as best you can.” And this is when Ole Rynnings bone were laid to rest in a coarse wooden box somewhere on the prairies at Beaver Creek.At his arrival Rynning had been a healthy, strong man who never avoided hard work, no matter how tough or unpleasant.

He roomed with a man in whose house the food mainly consisted of porridge and soured milk. Knud Langeland’ half-brother Mons Aadland told he often saw Rynning wade through ice water and slush with boots that were both torn and leaky. So, early 1838 he suffered a severe case of diarrhea, one that did not let up and caused his death later that Spring.Rynning’s manuscript was brought to Norway Anstein Knudsen Nattestad, a neighbor settler who traveled there to fetch his bride. Rynning wanted to have Pastor Kragh in Eidsvold first look at it and correct any misspellings, before it was printed in Christiania.

Nattestad has told that in reviewing the manuscript the good pastor had cut an entire chapter of it, one that criticized the attitude of the clergy in the Norwegian church. Rynning had charged them with showing an incomprehensible intolerance in questions of religion as well as doing nothing to improve the lives and education of the nations poor.Rynnings booklet created quite a stir when it was published in Christiania in 1838.

It became perhaps the most important provider of honest and useful information about emigrating to America and the conditions the emigrant would face there. It is factual, rich on details, and informative.



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